Fatal Vision - Joe McGinniss

Fatal Vision

By Joe McGinniss

  • Release Date: 1983-09-16
  • Genre: True Crime
Score: 4.5
4.5
From 69 Ratings

Description

The electrifying true crime story of Dr. Jeffrey MacDonald, the handsome, Princeton-educated physician convicted of savagely slaying his young pregnant wife and two small children, murders he vehemently denies committing...

Bestselling author Joe McGinniss chronicles every aspect of this horrifying and intricate crime and probes the life and psyche of the magnetic, all-American Jeffrey MacDonald—a golden boy who seemed destined to have it all. The result is a penetration to the heart of darkness that enshrouded one of the most complex criminal cases ever to capture the attention of the American public. It is a haunting, stunningly suspenseful work that no reader will be able to forget.

Includes photographs and a Special Epilogue by the author
 
Over one million copies sold!

Free Download OR Reading Online

Reviews

  • Convincing

    5
    By Rudy_Chasal
    This is an incredible, well-written book. However, I wish Apple would also carry the movie.
  • Still has me convinced

    5
    By Momma tm
    I loved this book when it first came out and I was an impressionable and idealistic teen, barely able to understand many of the complex legal and evidence presented. With recent hoopla over possible "new" evidence and with a little education and training in scientific evidence, I read it again. I still think this is an outstanding book that takes a grisly and horrifying crime and examines the difficult and long path to get to the realization of the first investigators on the scene, that Jeffrey MacDonald killed his wife and girls. As a mother now, I'm still nagged by question of why? I believe the evidence, especially the recent DNA results that bolster prosecution case (even those 3 unidentified hairs) and know right man is in prison, but it doesn't make me feel better, just sad that so much evil can exist.
  • Good but Scary Read

    4
    By RoosterLove
    This a well written book that fairly chronicles the gruesome green beret murders. Other than the last epilogue in which the author defends himself against a New Yorker article written about him and the book (really? Who cares? Did you have to immortalize her article by including it in your own book?), which seemed petty and unnecessary, the book flowed nicely and confidently backed up its assertions.
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